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Plants and forests

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Plants and forests

No other Icelandic region can boast of such varied, delightful woods as the East. In Hallormsstaðaskógur, the Icelander’s favorites forest, you will find some of Iceland’s highest growing birch, lovely paths with an arboretum, nowhere paralleled at such northerly latitudes. The hotels and campsites on the Lagarfljót lakeshore are perfect for relaxation.

In Fljótsdalshérað and elsewhere in the East, green groves of trees are becoming ever more common where the traveler can stop and enjoy the vegetation and wind shelter. The gravel banks of the rivers are bright pink with arctic fireweed and the grasslands and moors brightly colored with the flourishing arctic flora. At Snæfell, Iceland’s highest mountain outside Vatnajökull, you can observe the extreme survival skills of tiny flowers all the way to the top.

Atlavík

The inlet of Atlavík camp site in Hallormsstaðaskógur woodland is beautifully situated on the shores of Lake Lagarfljót. In the eighties Icelanders would flock to the legendary Atlavík Festival where no other than Ringo Starr performed in 1984!

Like other areas in Hallormsstaðaskógur, the inlet provides the shelter of trees, as well as a comparatively continental climate at the south end of the lake, far away from oceanic conditions. The forest is considered to be Iceland's largest one. It covers an area of 740 hectares, most of which is native birch. The birchwood remnants at Hallormsstaður were declared protected in 1905. Hallormsstaðaskógur is a popular outdoor recreational area for both locals and travellers, with its diverse landscapes and over 40 kms of versatile hiking routes and marked trails, open spaces and playgrounds. The Hallormsstaður Arboretum is unique in Iceland, comprising a collection of around 80 tree species from all over the world.

Selskógur

Selskógur the small forest on the eastern outskirts of Egilsstaðir, mainly consists of birch but also numerous rowans. Inviting woodchip trails of various lengths lure the wanderer to stroll through the peaceful surroundings. A football field and a playground are among other recreational options in the area.

Aldamótaskógur at Tinna

In the summer 2000, a project was started in Iceland to celebrate the turn of the century and the 70th anniversary of Iceland Forestry Society. Five Millennium Forests (Aldamótaskógur) were planted in Iceland; one tree for each living Icelander.

The plants, representing the inhabitants of Austurland, where planted by Tinnudalsá river (Tinna), at Eydalir. A few decades before, some trees had been planted in that same area turning it into a great outdoor recreational area. A beautiful marked hiking trail runs through the forest, along Tinna.

Hallormsstaðaskógur

Hallormsstaðaskógur National Forest is considered to be Iceland's largest forest. The forest covers an area of 740 hectares, most of which is native birch. The birchwood remnants at Hallormsstaður farm were declared protected in 1905 and thereby became Iceland's first national forest and is now managed by the Icelandic Forest Service.

Hallormsstaðaskógur is a popular outdoor recreational area for both locals and travellers, with its diverse landscapes and over 40 kms of versatile hiking routes and marked trails, camp sites, open spaces and playgrounds. The Hallormsstaður Arboretum is unique in Iceland, comprising a collection of around 80 tree species from all over the world.

The forest provides food, nest sites and protection from predators for several bird species. Year-round residents include redpoll, wren, goldcrest, ptarmigan, and raven. In summer the forest fills with redwings, snipes and meadow pipits along with woodcocks and wagtails. Besides birding, the forest offers opportunities for botanising and picking berries and mushrooms.

Jórvíkurskógur

Jórvíkurskógur is an attractive Icelandic woodland. It has all that the local people desire: Green growth and plants with berries and mushrooms. The trees are tall enough to form a wind-shelter, there are nice hiking trails and lovely brooklets with pure water flowing briskly, old farmhouse, and green lawns. This is an ideal spot for resting peacefully and enjoy life.

Austurland

Towns & Villages

Each town in Austurland has its own characteristics. In some of the coastal villages t, the influence of North European neighbors obvious to everyone. 

The French made a strong impact in Fáskrúðsfjörður where the road signs are made out in French as well as in Icelandic. Norwegian influence is easily detected in the Eskifjörður and Seydisfjörður architecture. No such roots are to be seen in Egilsstadir which is the latest addition to East Iceland agglomeration, founded in the late forties of the 20th century.  

Map Vopnafjörður Borgarfjörður Eystri Egilsstaðir Seyðisfjörður Mjóifjörður Neskaupstaður Breiðdalsvík Eskifjörður Reyðarfjörður Fáskrúðsfjörður Stöðvarfjörður Djúpivogur