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Breiðdalsvík

Tiny Breiðdalsvík is a relatively young fishing village with some surprises, and plenty of small-town hospitality. It lies on the coast with great seascapes and black sand beaches, making fishing and boat tours popular from its old harbor.

Some of the loveliest scenery lies inland from the town, in the spectacular valley of Breiðdalur (its name means ‘Wide Valley’). This is the longest and widest of the valleys in East Iceland, and it’s surrounded by majestic mountains rising to over 1000 meters on both sides. The impressive Breiðdalsá river, well known for salmon fishing, winds its way scenically across the valley basin to the sea. Breiðdalur makes a wonderful place for exploration and activity, from hiking to horse-riding. There are waterfalls and small forests to discover, and colorful rhyolite peaks to admire. Local guides can help you explore hard-to-reach places and let you in on local secrets.

Back in Breiðdalsvík, take a step back in time inside the old general store, preserved with some quirky 1950s features, then head next door to the craft brewery (yes, even a town of around 140 people needs a brewery!). Be sure to check out the local heritage inside the old fish factory on the main street, which displays a fascinating old relief map of Iceland.

Highlights:

Walk: south of town is the Streitishvarf area, a peninsula and cliffside location with marked trails, a lighthouse and delightful views.

Taste: there’s great locally caught fish, and it pairs well with beer from the town’s craft brewery Beljandi, named after a beautiful local waterfall found in Breiðdalur.

Road-trip: as an alternative to Route 1 (the Ring Road), you can take Route 95 through Breiðdalur then continue as it climbs over Breiðdalsheiði, an ancient, eroded volcano. The views over the valley and coast are unforgettable. Route 95 ends in Egilsstaðir.

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Breiðdalsvík
GPS Points N64° 47' 34.462" W14° 0' 22.941"
Postal codes

760

Travel directory for Breiðdalsvík

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Others

Katrine Bruhn Jensen
Day Tours
  • Gilsá
  • 760 Breiðdalsvík
  • 862-5756
Breiðdalshreppur Sport Center
Swimming Pools
  • Selnesi 25
  • 760 Breiðdalsvík
  • 470-9090
Fell Horse Rental
Day Tours
  • Fell
  • 760 Breiðdalsvík
  • 8974318

Others

Innri-Kleif
Cottages
  • Breiðdalur
  • 760 Breiðdalsvík
  • 475-6789
Gljúfraborg
Guesthouses
  • Gljúfraborg
  • 760 Breiðdalsvík
  • -
Háaleiti Cottages
Cottages
  • Skarð
  • 760 Breiðdalsvík
  • 475-6798, 854-6798
Skarð
Hostels
  • 475-6798, 848-6798

Others

Hamar Kaffihús
Restaurants
  • Þverhamar 2a
  • 760 Breiðdalsvík
  • 846-5547
Nature
Aldamótaskógur at Tinna

In the summer 2000, a project was started in Iceland to celebrate the turn of the century and the 70th anniversary of Iceland Forestry Society. Five Millennium Forests (Aldamótaskógur) were planted in Iceland; one tree for each living Icelander.

The plants, representing the inhabitants of Austurland, where planted by Tinnudalsá river (Tinna), at Eydalir. A few decades before, some trees had been planted in that same area turning it into a great outdoor recreational area. A beautiful marked hiking trail runs through the forest, along Tinna.

Nature
Breiðdalseldstöð

Breiðdalur central volcano is an ancient volcanic area above Breiðdalur valley and Berufjörður, It was the object of extensive research carried out by the English geologist George D.L. Walker who made East-Iceland teritary volocanologic phenomenons the main object of his professional work. The Breiðdalur area of volcanism is set with rhyolithic-inserts producing the mainstay of majestic mountain range separating Breiðdalur and Berufjörður, e.g. Mt. Flögutindur , Mt.Smátindar, Mt. Röndólfur, Mt. Slöttur and Mt. Stöng. The southern side of the volcanic formation is highly colourful and the intrusions assume an irregular aspect, set with tephra-layers.

The site of the central volcano extends between Mt. Fossárfjall south of Berufjörður to Mt. Bæjartindur which towers above farm Þorgrímsstaðir in Breiðdalur. The western slope runs along Mt. Ófærunafir towards the west, whereas the eastern side - although highly eroded - extends east of Mt. Kerlingartindur, S- Breiðdalur. The southern region of Breiðdalur - the very centre of area - forms a basin where the excruciating heat has transformed the rock to such an extent that the basalt and the andestite have turned pale-green, making it problematic to tell them apart from the rhyolite. This can be clearly detected at river Innri-Ljósá Blágil ravine.

The beforementioned chain of mountains was formed at a later date as the rhyolite wielded its way to the surface through the basalt layers, forming insertions on top of the massive tephra layers along the edges of the crater. Their remnants are visible in rhyolithic-rocks throughout the Breiðdalur region. This central volcano is considered to be of later date than its Álfta- and Reyðarfjörður counterparts. The Reyðarfjörður ignimbrite, a pyroclastic flow made as a burning hot mixture of particles and gases flew from the volcano, originated from Mt.Röndólfur, covering about 430 km² with a diameter of about 6 m. þykkt. This layer is linked the Mt. Skessa south of Reyðarfjörður, best known as the Skessulag. The immense volcanism of the area has resulted in a great variety of rare minerals and semi-precious stones on display at Petra's wonderful stone collection in Stöðvarfjörður and The Breiðdalur mineral museum in Breiðdalsvík.

History and Culture
Heydalir (Eydalir)

There has been a vicarage at Heydalir since early Christianity in Iceland and several renowned vicars have served there through the ages. Among them was the vicar and hymn poet Einar Sigurðsson (17th century) whose poetry is still venerated among the nation. A pillar stone has been erected in his memory at Heydalir.

The church that now stands in Heydalir was hallowed July 13th in 1975 and the old church was unchurched that same day. The old church was built in 1856 but it burned to the ground on June 17th, 1982.

The name of the place is somewhat erratic; some people talk say Haydalir and Heydalir is mentioned in some of Iceland's old Sagas. Others talk about Eydalir, especially older locals, and the vicar Einar Sigurðsson is associated with Eydalir. In the church´s record book, which has been in use since 1909, both names are used equally. Today the official name of this place is Heydalir.

Nature
Meleyri

Meleyri is a charming shoreline near Breiðdalsvík. This is an outdoor area, a colorful birdlife arena and popular among locals and tourists alike. The locals use this area a lot, especially during winter because snow des not stick to the sand.

Nature
Flögufoss

Flögufoss is the highest waterfall in Breiðdalur valley, around 60 meters high. The waterfall is in the river Flöguá that runs through the Flöguskarð mountain pass. Just above Flögufoss is another small waterfall that falls to a ledge, from where the river runs under a small rock arch.

The hiking path leading to the waterfall is easy and short.

History and Culture
Höskuldsstaðir

Höskuldsstaðir is a farmstead of distinction, located in the south branch of valley Breiðdalur, close to highway no. one. A post office up to 1947 and a relay for the postmen on their way across Berufjörður pass. Höskuldsstaðir was the birthplace of the venerated scolar Dr. Stefán Einarsson former proffesor at the John Hopkins University of Baltimore. Einarsson is remembered for his literary achievements as well as for his research in the sphere of the Icelandic language.

Nature
Jórvíkurskógur

Jórvíkurskógur is an attractive Icelandic woodland. It has all that the local people desire: Green growth and plants with berries and mushrooms. The trees are tall enough to form a wind-shelter, there are nice hiking trails and lovely brooklets with pure water flowing briskly, old farmhouse, and green lawns. This is an ideal spot for resting peacefully and enjoy life.

Austurland

Towns & Villages

Each town in Austurland has its own characteristics. In some of the coastal villages t, the influence of North European neighbors obvious to everyone. 

The French made a strong impact in Fáskrúðsfjörður where the road signs are made out in French as well as in Icelandic. Norwegian influence is easily detected in the Eskifjörður and Seydisfjörður architecture. No such roots are to be seen in Egilsstadir which is the latest addition to East Iceland agglomeration, founded in the late forties of the 20th century.  

Map Vopnafjörður Borgarfjörður Eystri Egilsstaðir Seyðisfjörður Mjóifjörður Neskaupstaður Breiðdalsvík Eskifjörður Reyðarfjörður Fáskrúðsfjörður Stöðvarfjörður Djúpivogur