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Djúpivogur

In the southern pocket of East Iceland, life moves at an unhurried pace. The scenic town of Djúpivogur is part of Cittaslow, ‘an international network of cities where living is good’. Towns that subscribe to the Cittaslow movement focus on the authenticity of products, good food based on the slow food philosophy, rich and fascinating local craft traditions, and the protection of the environment together with the joy of slow and quiet living on a daily basis.

A tranquil pace allows time for locals and visitors to stroll, explore, and breathe deeply. Come see the benefits, and check out the unexpected history and creativity on display. There’s a long history of trading since 1589, and the oldest house in Djúpivogur (called Langabúð, built in 1790) now serves as a cultural center. Local craftspeople have studios and quirky outdoor galleries, and don't miss the outdoor sculpture called Eggin í Gleðivík, by artist Sigurður Guðmundsson. The sculpture is of 34 oversized eggs arranged along the waterfront, and it celebrates another drawcard of the area: the rich birdlife. Shallow lagoons, coastal lakes and mudflats in the area are magnets for feathered friends, and the Búlandsnes sanctuary is renowned among bird-lovers. Offshore from Djúpivogur is the small, uninhabited island of Papey, a favorite for puffin-watching. 

Dominating the landscape is the pyramid-shaped peak named Búlandstindur, reaching 1069 meters. According to legend, it can make wishes come true during the summer solstice; others believe it has supernatural powers. All year round, it fulfills the wishes of hikers looking for interesting trails.

 

Highlights:

Walk: among birdlife at Búlandsnes sanctuary, or with some care to the peak of mystical Búlandstindur.

Taste: homemade cakes at Langabúð, the oldest house in town. It’s now home to sculptures, a heritage museum, and a sweet coffeeshop.

Soak: with locals at the modern swimming pool.

Road-trip: follow the winding Ring Road in and out of town for some scenic natural highlights. Head north for Teigarhorn nature reserve and beautiful Berufjörður, or south to the black sands of rugged Stapavík beach.

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Djúpivogur
GPS Points N64° 39' 20.790" W14° 16' 55.543"
Postal codes

765

Travel directory for Djúpivogur

The official travel index of Iceland

Others

Cultural Center - Langabúð
Museums
  • Búð I
  • 765 Djúpivogur
  • 4788220
Nanna´s Memorial Museum
Museums
  • Berufjörður 1
  • 765 Djúpivogur
  • 478-8977, 478-8975
Bragdavellir Cottages
Cottages
  • Bragðavellir
  • 765 Djúpivogur
  • 478-8240

Others

Sjónahraun cottages
Cottages
  • Starmýri 2
  • 765 Djúpivogur
  • 8474872, 859-4270
Bragdavellir Cottages
Cottages
  • Bragðavellir
  • 765 Djúpivogur
  • 478-8240
Krákhamar
Apartments
  • Blábjörg
  • 765 Djúpivogur
  • 8618806
Fossárdalur
Guesthouses
  • Berufjörður
  • 765 Djúpivogur
  • 820-4379

Others

Bragdavellir Cottages
Cottages
  • Bragðavellir
  • 765 Djúpivogur
  • 478-8240
Cultural Center - Langabúð
Museums
  • Búð I
  • 765 Djúpivogur
  • 4788220
History and Culture
Papey

For centuries Papey was the only inhabited island off Iceland's east coast. The name is a Celtic one, meaning "Friar's Island." Two 12th-century Icelandic sources affirm Irish monks founded a hermitage here, perhaps having been chased off the mainland by the Norse. However, excavations have not yet confirmed habitation prior to the 10th century.
Settlers led a self-sufficient life growing potatoes, tending sheep, sustaining themselves on birds, eggs, fish, seals, and sharks. Later generations harvested down from eider-duck nests.
Papey's population peaked in 1726, totaling 16 inhabitants. The last full-time resident left the island in1948. Primetime to visit is spring until mid-summer when Papey is overrun with guillemots. Puffins and other birds are seen until the end of August, though some birds are seen through summer as well as the seals.
The island boasts Iceland's oldest wooden church.

Austurland

Towns & Villages

Each town in Austurland has its own characteristics. In some of the coastal villages t, the influence of North European neighbors obvious to everyone. 

The French made a strong impact in Fáskrúðsfjörður where the road signs are made out in French as well as in Icelandic. Norwegian influence is easily detected in the Eskifjörður and Seydisfjörður architecture. No such roots are to be seen in Egilsstadir which is the latest addition to East Iceland agglomeration, founded in the late forties of the 20th century.  

Map Vopnafjörður Borgarfjörður Eystri Egilsstaðir Seyðisfjörður Mjóifjörður Neskaupstaður Breiðdalsvík Eskifjörður Reyðarfjörður Fáskrúðsfjörður Stöðvarfjörður Djúpivogur