Travel search
Can't find it? Try searching for it :)

Fáskrúðsfjörður

Fáskrúðsfjörður dishes up a Gallic surprise in the middle of the Eastfjords: a strong historical connection to France that today is showcased and celebrated. The village road signs are even in French!

The fjord’s town is called Búðir, but everyone calls it Fáskrúðsfjörður. It became a trading post in 1880, and from the latter part of the 19th century until 1935 it was the main hub for French fishermen working off Iceland’s east coast. The town is well known for its French heritage and has a strong connection to its counterpart in northern France, Gravelines (where most of the seafarers sailed from).

Just outside the town is a graveyard, the burial place of French (and Belgian) sailors. The town’s hub is the former French hospital, built in 1903. Today it is a beautifully restored hotel and restaurant, with an award-winning museum on-site that details the French seafaring life in East Iceland.

A tunnel connects Fáskrúðsfjörður and Reyðarfjörður, but the longer coastal route, along Road 955, delivers scenic views – look out for the legend-filled island of Skrúður, home to thousands of puffins and gannets in summer. The island is surrounded by high cliffs accessible only to the bold and the brave; it’s home to a sizeable cave that was occasionally used by sailors seeking shelter.

Highlights:

Walk: Feeling energetic? Climb Sandfell, a 743-meter rhyolite mountain on the southern side the fjord. With less ambition, it’s fun to stroll around town to see French connections in buildings, street names and monuments.

Taste: look for French influences in the menu of the Fosshotel restaurant, and dine with grand views over the fjord.

Road-trip: opt for the longer scenic route instead of the convenient Route 1 tunnel. Take Road 955 for sweeping views.

 

3af3d0e583108d1aa544b6d25c91fdb2
Fáskrúðsfjörður
GPS Points N64° 55' 47.889" W14° 0' 30.403"
Postal codes

750

Travel directory for Fáskrúðsfjörður

The official travel index of Iceland

Nature
Kolfreyjustaður

The vicarage Kolfreyjustaður in Fáskrúðsfjörður dates back to the year 1878 many old and beautiful artifacts are there to be seen. The place swarms with stories and legends. The troll Kolfreyja lends her name to the site and her fellow troll lived in the island of Skrúður.

History and Culture
The French Graveyard - le cimetiere francais

Just outside the village Búðir in Fáskrúðsfjörður, you will find the French graveyard. The graveyard is from the times of the French sailors who came to Fáskrúðsfjörður for many years. There are 49 known graves in the yard.

Nature
Skrúður

Skrúður is an island haven in the mouth of fjord Fáskrúðsfjörður. It is surrounded by high cliffs accessible only to the bold and brave. On the island, there is a sizable cave which was occasionally used as a shelter for sailors making their way southwards. Legends say there were three giant brothers living in the East, one of whom made his home in Skrúður, the other in Streitishvarf and the third on the island of Papey. The Skrúður dweller abducted his wife from the on-shore vicarage of Kolfreyjustaður; the local priest´s young daughter. Legends relating to their insular existence lived among the sailors who visited the island.

Nature
Sandfell

Sandfell is a distinctive 743m. high rhyolite mountain between Stöðvarfjörður and Fáskrúðsfjörður. The best approach is from the south side of Fáskrúðsfjörður. The trail leaves the coastal road between Víkurgerði and Vík farms and proceeds along the Víkurgerðisá River before cutting west for the peak. The scenery is excellent en route, with views of Fáskrúðsfjörður, Andey and Skrúður islands. The ascent + descent takes approx. 5 hours.

Powered by Wikiloc

Austurland

Towns & Villages

Each town in Austurland has its own characteristics. In some of the coastal villages t, the influence of North European neighbors obvious to everyone. 

The French made a strong impact in Fáskrúðsfjörður where the road signs are made out in French as well as in Icelandic. Norwegian influence is easily detected in the Eskifjörður and Seydisfjörður architecture. No such roots are to be seen in Egilsstadir which is the latest addition to East Iceland agglomeration, founded in the late forties of the 20th century.  

Map Vopnafjörður Borgarfjörður Eystri Egilsstaðir Seyðisfjörður Mjóifjörður Neskaupstaður Breiðdalsvík Eskifjörður Reyðarfjörður Fáskrúðsfjörður Stöðvarfjörður Djúpivogur