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What to see and do

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What to see and do

East Iceland is Iceland's best kept secret. It is an expansive, enchanting region, where you can find all of Iceland's attractive aspects, culture and a flourishing society, endless opportunities for entertainment and outdoor recreation, picturesque nature in all directions and more natural sights than almost anywhere else. Some people go walking, swimming or golfing, while others choose fishing, hunting, riding horses, or adventurous trips on the sea, lakes or rivers. All around, something is offered to suit everyone, such as trips to other towns, out to islands, or into the highlands to view mountains, waterfalls, glacial rivers, volcanic craters, extraordinary landscape and other geological features. The season of autumn brings its marvellous colours, while winter has its own charm, as winter sports take over, the northern lights dance in the cold sky, and the darkness itself provides inspiration and spiritual uplifting. Check out our Official Tourist Guide or see the videos.

Hope to see you in East Iceland!

Recreation

What gives you inspiration? A restless ocean? A raging river?  Ephemeral northern lights? A tasty blood pudding? Let Iceland inspire you. The island and its surrounding waters manifest an incredibly breathtaking nature and its inhabitants preserve and nurture an unequaled culture. However, each part of the country is unique, and East Iceland has all this to offer and more. 

Kárahnjúkar

Kárahnjúkar Dam and Hálslón reservoir were created as part of Iceland's most extensive construction project to date, and have since been visited by numerous tourists. The two tuff peaks named Kárahnjúkar stand tall on the east bank of the Jökulsá river and canyon, which ranks as one of Iceland's deepest and most impressive. The long-term use of the reservoir here to turn the powerful turbines down at Fljótsdalur Station began in late 2006.

Fljótsdalshérað

The viewpoint indicator at the western extremity of Fjarðarheiði pass (alt. 620 m.) between Seyðisfjörður and the lowland around Egilsstaðir, serves as a good indicator when contemplating the panorama of the region. On a clear day, Mount Gagnheiði to the south will provide an even higher vantage point. The "Hérað" -colloquially short for "Fljótsdalshérað"- has long referred to the broad valley extending and branching sw. inland from Héraðsflói bay. Among Icelanders, the valleys of Fljótsdalshérað have long enjoyed a reputation for natural beauty and nice climate. This has been still enhanced by forest cultivation with trees gradually providing more shelter from chilly gales from the North. When summer breeze blows from the South or West, however, a Föhn effect often emerges, resulting in high temperatures and calm from evening till mid-morning. A quiet evening at Atlavík inlet, viewing the calm of the lake , is an experience unsurpassed. By Icelandic standards, Fljótsdalshérað enjoys a favourable climate, whatever the season, reminiscent of that of Scandinavia.

Others

Askja Guesthouse
  • Strandgata 86b
  • 735 Eskifjörður
  • 476-1150, 894-6606

East Iceland

Towns & Villages

Each town in East Iceland has its own characteristics. In some of the coastal villages the influence of North European neighbours is obvious to everyone. 

The French made a strong impact in Fáskrúðsfjörður where the road signs are made out in French as well as in Icelandic. Norwegian influence is easily detected in the Eskifjörður and Seydisfjörður architecture. No such roots are to be seen in Egilsstadir which is latest addition to East Iceland agglomeration, founded in the late forties of the 20th century.  

Map Vopnafjörður Borgarfjörður Eystri Egilsstaðir Seyðisfjörður Mjóifjörður Fljótsdalshérað Neskaupstaður Breiðdalsvík Eskifjörður Reyðarfjörður Fáskrúðsfjörður Stöðvarfjörður Djúpivogur