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The history of Austurland is diverse and there are many interesting, historic places in Austurland. Below are examples of places we recommend exploring if you are interested in the history of Austurland.

Bustarfell
 In Hofsárdalur you will find the old family farm Bustarfell, a quaint, centuries old Icelandic turf house with red gables and a grass-grown roof which is now a museum. Bustarfell is one of the oldest and best preserved turf houses in Iceland. In1532, the farm was bought by Árni Brandsson and his wife Úlfheiður, the farm has been owned by their descendants ever since.  A visit to the museum at Bustarfell is a journey through the history of farming and changes in lifestyle from the beginning of the 18th century to the mid-20th century. When walking through the museum you feel the inhabitants have only just left the house. Three kitchens from different eras are showcased, as well as other artifacts from around the farm which show how technology developed.    Hjáleigan Café is located next to the museum and a hiking path leads to the rock Álfkonusteinn, source of a local folktale.   
Galtastaðir Fram Turf house
The old farm of Galtastaðir Fram is a well-preserved turf house from the 19th century. Inhabited until 1967 the building exemplifies the sort of housing common in Iceland in previous centuries, heated to some extent by keeping cows under the communal living room or "baðstofa", which was also used for sleeping and handcraft.  Both the interior and exterior of this small but remarkable showcase of former living conditions can be visited by the consent of the proprietor. Galtastaðir Fram has ranked on the preservation list of the National Museum since 1976. 
Skriðuklaustur
Skriðuklaustur is an ancient manor and magistrate's residence in Fljótsdalur. There was a monastery at Skriðuklaustur from 1493-1552. The ruins of the monastery have been excavated, and the excavation revealed that medicine and bookmaking were practiced there. Various remarkable objects were also found in the excavation. In 1939, the author Gunnar Gunnarsson settled in Skriðuklaustur and built a unique mansion. Gunnar gave the estate to the Icelandic state when he moved to Reykjavík in 1948. An agricultural experimental station was run at Skriðuklaustur for a long time, but in the year 2000, Gunnarsstofnun opened there. Today Skriðuklaustur is run as a cultural and educational center. During the summer, various exhibitions are available, and guests can receive personal guided tours of the poet's house.
Nielsenshus
The Nielsen House was the first private house erected  in the village of Egilsstaðir , built in the year 1944 by the danish Oswald Nielsen. Today it houses a nice coffe house and a restaurant, th Café Nielsen. 
Valþjófsstaður
Valþjófsstaður in Fljótsdalur valley enjoys a century-long reputation as a farm of prestige, a vicarage, and a site of culture and distinction. In times of yore, it was the residence of the Þórarinsson brothers, Þorvarður, one of the most powerful men in Iceland in his day (d. 1297), and Oddur, a great warrior slain at farm Geldingaholt in 1255. The famous Valþjófsstaður church door, one of the finest items in the National Museum at Reykjavík, derives from Valþjófsstaður. The present door is an exact replica.
Djáknadys
According to legend the mound marks the spot where the pastor of Háls and the deacon of Hamar fought to the death. Both were buried at the site, and that is the origin of the name Djáknadys (Deacon’s Burial Mound). Tradition requires every traveller, on first passing by Djáknadys, must throw a pebble or stone onto the mound: one for him/herself, and one for every horse or dog accompanying them. If they fail to do so they will lose their way. Another version of the tradition is that travellers must place three stones on the mound. An old verse on the subject says: To quickly dismount and fling a stone over the aged deacon brings good fortune along the road. Please treat this protected heritage site with respect and care. Do not remove stones from the mound and do not dispose of refuse under stones. 
Eiðar
Eiðar (approx. 15 km drive from Egilsstaðir) is a church site with longstanding and important cultural and educational background. One of the first agricultural schools in Iceland was founded in Eiðar in 1883 which later converted into a general educational center for Austurland. Its function as a school was discontinued in 1995 and since then many ideas have been launched as to its future role. Tourism and services to travellers has grown in recent years with a guesthouse, camping site and recreational area. A great location for travellers who want to stay in a peaceful and picturesque area on the banks of beautiful Lake Lagarfljót in the center of Austurland. 
Heydalir (Eydalir)
There has been a vicarage at Heydalir since early Christianity in Iceland and several renowned vicars have served there through the ages. Among them was the vicar and hymn poet Einar Sigurðsson (17th century) whose poetry is still venerated among the nation. A pillar stone has been erected in his memory at Heydalir. The church that now stands in Heydalir was hallowed July 13th in 1975 and the old church was unchurched that same day. The old church was built in 1856 but it burned to the ground on June 17th, 1982. The name of the place is somewhat erratic; some people talk say Haydalir and Heydalir is mentioned in some of Iceland’s old Sagas. Others talk about Eydalir, especially older locals, and the vicar Einar Sigurðsson is associated with Eydalir. In the church´s record book, which has been in use since 1909, both names are used equally. Today the official name of this place is Heydalir.