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The Ring of Riverdale

Egilsstaðir
The hub of the east, Egilsstaðir is the largest town in the region and it’s home to all the services a traveler might need. Across the bridge is the sister town of Fellabær, and together the population for the twin towns nudges 3000 inhabitants.   Transport connections are easy: Egilsstaðir airport has daily flights to and from Reykjavík, and buses connect to larger regional towns. Egilsstaðir makes a great hub for exploration – on its doorstep is Lagarfljót, a lake that may or may not be home to a monster, plus scenic hiking trails and roads to deliver you to neighboring fjords, forests, highland farms, waterfalls and wide open spaces. Just outside Fellabær is the newest addition to Iceland’s stellar collection of designer bathing spots, Vök Baths.   Egilsstaðir’s food scene is full of local flavor – you can sample farm-fresh produce and locally produced beer, and satisfy all budgets in restaurants that range from quick, easy pit-stops for road-trippers to upmarket dining rooms showcasing unique ingredients that haven’t traveled far to reach your plate.   There are places to tap into local culture, too, including the local museum with its focus on history and the introduction of reindeer to the region. Annual festivals celebrate an eclectic array of themes, including jazz music, winter darkness,and lake-dwelling beasts.    Highlights:  Walk: to Fardagafoss, a waterfall at the foot of Fjarðaheiði heath.   Taste: local reindeer, served in one of the fine restaurants. Vegetarians should look out for barley grown in the area.  Soak: with local kids at the town’s outdoor swimming pool, or in pools floating atop a lake at Vök Baths.  Road-trip: around the shores of Lagarfljót, to check out splendid Hengifoss waterfall, Skriðuklaustur monastery andSnæfellsstofa, a visitor center for the eastern area of Vatnajökull National Park.
Vallanes
Vallanes is a farm and a vicarage, known for the habitation of many leading scholars and literates of centuries past. Today the farmers of Vallanes are renowned for organic farming and pioneer products, i.a. vegetables and barley. They also produce food and cosmetics under the brand name of  "Móðir Jörð" - "Mother Earth".  In the last century, the locals of the surrounding district erected their community centre, Iðavellir, on the outskirts of Vallanes, and there the East Iceland Equestrian Association has its main hub on the grounds for races and shows.  
Hallormsstaðaskógur
Hallormsstaðaskógur National Forest is considered to be Iceland's largest forest. The forest covers an area of 740 hectares, most of which is native birch. The birchwood remnants at Hallormsstaður farm were declared protected in 1905 and thereby became Iceland's first national forest and is now managed by the Icelandic Forest Service. Hallormsstaðaskógur is a popular outdoor recreational area for both locals and travellers, with its diverse landscapes and over 40 kms of versatile hiking routes and marked trails, camp sites, open spaces and playgrounds. The Hallormsstaður Arboretum is unique in Iceland, comprising a collection of around 80 tree species from all over the world.  The forest provides food, nest sites and protection from predators for several bird species. Year-round residents include redpoll, wren, goldcrest, ptarmigan, and raven. In summer the forest fills with redwings, snipes and meadow pipits along with woodcocks and wagtails. Besides birding, the forest offers opportunities for botanising and picking berries and mushrooms. 
Hallormsstaður
Hallormsstaður is a former parsonage. A small village has formed in this area through the years in connection with the school, travel industry, and the work in the forest. The forest of Hallormsstaður is the largest forest in Iceland. In 1903 the Forest Department was founded in Hallormsstaður. A remarkable tree museum has formed in the forest of hallormsstaður through the years. At the tree museum, there are walking paths making it easy to go through the history of tree planting in Iceland. There are art exhibitions in the area and many other events. atlavík, which is located deep in the forest is a beloved attraction for tourists.
Atlavík
The inlet of Atlavík camp site in Hallormsstaðaskógur woodland is beautifully situated on the shores of Lake Lagarfljót. In the eighties Icelanders would flock to the legendary Atlavík Festival where no other than Ringo Starr performed in 1984! Like other areas in Hallormsstaðaskógur, the inlet provides the shelter of trees, as well as a comparatively continental climate at the south end of the lake, far away from oceanic conditions. The forest is considered to be Iceland’s largest one. It covers an area of 740 hectares, most of which is native birch. The birchwood remnants at Hallormsstaður were declared protected in 1905. Hallormsstaðaskógur is a popular outdoor recreational area for both locals and travellers, with its diverse landscapes and over 40 kms of versatile hiking routes and marked trails, open spaces and playgrounds. The Hallormsstaður Arboretum is unique in Iceland, comprising a collection of around 80 tree species from all over the world.   
Lagarfljót and Lögurinn
Lagarfljót is one of Iceland's deepest lakes covering about 140 kms from its source in Eyjabakkajökull glacier to Héraðsflói bay. The innermost section forms the lake Lögurinn with a surface of 53 square kilometers and average depth of 51 m, reaching 112 m where it is deepest. Its deep mysterious glacial waters are home to Iceland's ancient and much older equivalent of the Loch Ness Monster; the terrifying sea-worm-like Wyrm or Lagarfljótsormur.  The oldest recorded sighting dates back to 1345. It was considered a bad omen if the curved forms of the monster were spotted above the water's edge. In recent years the Wyrm has mostly kept to itself but pay close attention as you never know when it may reveal itself again!
Lagarfljót Worm
The gigantic serpentine sea monster, or worm, of Lagarfljót (Lögurinn) lake, is Fljótsdalshérað's most famous creature. As it was already mentioned in chronicles of 1345, it has reached ripe old age. Initially, the wyrm was merely a little slug that was placed on a golden ring - at that time suggested as a method of multiplying gold. However, when the girl who owned the ring opened the shrine containing the ring and the slug, she was dismayed by the rapid growth of the worm - swelling with pride over its treasure, while the ring remained the same. Panicking, the girl hurled the shrine and its contents into the lake. As time passed, the slug grew into a wyrm frightening the locals and belching poison over the farmlands. Some say that two Finnish magicians were eventually engaged to tackle the monster and that they managed to restrain the beast by shaking its extremities to the lakebed. Others claim it was the popular bishop of North Iceland, Guðmundur - nicknamed "the Benevolent"- who tied the wyrm down in this way, so tightly that it only manages to arch its back up above the surface. Legend declares that if the wyrm ever disengages itself, not only will it raise a ruckus, but it will bring about the end of the world...  
Hengifoss
Apart from having recently been re-defined as Iceland's second-highest waterfall, the Hengifoss is particularly picturesque. The layers between numerous Tertiary lava strata yield a reddish color particularly salient in the cliffs around Hengifoss. Moreover, underway towards Hengifoss, the Litlanesfoss presents impressive stands of basalt columns on both sides of the gorge. Usually, the climb ends well below Hengifoss, at a point where it can easily be admired without crossing the river. However, if the flow is scarce -  as is often the case in autumn - it is feasible to go closer and even enter a shallow cave behind the waterfall. There is an easy walking path from the highway to Hengifoss, it takes 40-60 minutes to walk from the parking lot to the waterfall. www.hengifoss.is Powered by Wikiloc
Skriðuklaustur
Skriðuklaustur is an ancient manor and magistrate's residence in Fljótsdalur. There was a monastery at Skriðuklaustur from 1493-1552. The ruins of the monastery have been excavated, and the excavation revealed that medicine and bookmaking were practiced there. Various remarkable objects were also found in the excavation. In 1939, the author Gunnar Gunnarsson settled in Skriðuklaustur and built a unique mansion. Gunnar gave the estate to the Icelandic state when he moved to Reykjavík in 1948. An agricultural experimental station was run at Skriðuklaustur for a long time, but in the year 2000, Gunnarsstofnun opened there. Today Skriðuklaustur is run as a cultural and educational center. During the summer, various exhibitions are available, and guests can receive personal guided tours of the poet's house.
Snæfellsstofa Visitor Centre, Skriðuklaustur
Snæfellsstofa is the information center for the eastern territory of Vatnajökull National Park. It is situated at Skriðuklausturis in an environmentally friendly building. The house itself is the first of its kind in the country. It is designed and built according to environmentally sound standards (BREEAM). In Snæfellsstofa you can find an exhibition about nature and wildlife in the area, multimedia and activities for children. Souvenir shop with focus on local products, coffee sale and internet on site. Free admission. Vatnajökull National Park is one of the largest National Parks in Europe. It was established in 2008 and covers an area of around 14000 square kilometers which is about 14% of the surface of Iceland. The glacier covers about half of the Park, offering a unique interplay between fire and ice, volcanic activity, glacial and geological formations and waterfalls. The Park contains many areas of historical interest and an extraordinary variety of landscapes which contain some of the nation´s greatest natural treasures. It occupies a very important place in the world of natural science, due to, among other things, the dynamic interaction between fire and ice, which is still very much at work today. For opening hours, please visit this website here.
Wilderness center
Wilderness Center of Iceland - Center of Recreation The Wilderness Center is an authentic and peaceful hideaway, located right on the edge of Northern Europe´s most extensive wilderness. One can experience the spirit of the past through a variety of services, such as unique accommodation, local food, exhibitions, horse riding and hiking, stargazing/Aurora station, day tours, escorted tours, super jeep tours, and tailor-made tours. The center's tranquil and pleasant location, as well as the distinct choice of accommodation and unique setting both indoors and out, will draw guests into adventures of the past and offer a unique atmosphere. Delicious food from local ingredients is cooked from scratch in the open home-style kitchen. Cakes and bread are also home-made. The Center offers a variety of activity and services. One can go hiking along waterfalls, cross the river on a cable-bridge, go horseback riding, rent mountain bikes, go fishing, gaze at the stars in the stargazing hut or visit the creative museum about the history of the Icelandic wilderness, where one can walk into the adventures of the Icelandic wilderness and be touched by the dramatic struggle between the forces of nature and the Icelander´s fight to survive. Many different day tours can be made from the Wilderness Center either self-drive or escorted. For example to Hengifoss, Laugarfell hot springs, Snæfell area, Hafrahvammagljúfur canyons and many more. Multi-day, tailormade tours can also be arranged, all year around. MUSEUM - HIKING - RIDING - MOUNTAIN BIKING - FISHING - STARGAZING - ACCOMMODATION - LOCAL FOOD - GUIDED TOURS TEL: +354 440 8822 / info@wilderness.is / www.wilderness.is
Valþjófsstaður
Valþjófsstaður in Fljótsdalur valley enjoys a century-long reputation as a farm of prestige, a vicarage, and a site of culture and distinction. In times of yore, it was the residence of the Þórarinsson brothers, Þorvarður, one of the most powerful men in Iceland in his day (d. 1297), and Oddur, a great warrior slain at farm Geldingaholt in 1255. The famous Valþjófsstaður church door, one of the finest items in the National Museum at Reykjavík, derives from Valþjófsstaður. The present door is an exact replica.
Fellabær Golf Course
You can happily play golf on the course in Fljótsdalshérað. There is a cozy 9-hole course run by Fljótsdalshérað golf club. The course is called Ekkjufellsvöllur and is par 70 in addition to boasting a par-5 course, six par-4 courses, and two par-3 courses.
Vök Baths
Vök Baths is a geothermal destination on the beautiful Lake Urriðavatn in East Iceland. Located only 5-kilometres northwest of Egilsstaðir, the largest settlement in the East, Vök Baths is an essential stop on any visit to this part of the country.