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Events

15. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

Christmas buffet in the Forest - Hallormsstaður

Christmas buffet in the Forest. Live music Christmas buffet 8.900 kr. Double Room 13.900 kr · Single Room 10.500 kr. Breakfast & Spa included in accommodation! More info: veisla@701hotels.is
Hallormsstaður

Christmas market - Fellabær

Christmas market in Valgerðarstaðir in Fellabær
10:00-16:00 Fellabær

Blues Band Beauty and the Blues - Breiðdalsvík

Concert with the blues band Beauty and the Blues
21:00-23:50 Breiðdalsvík

Christmas Party on Feiti Fíllinn - Egilsstaðir

Christmas Party on Feiti Fíllinn with Ingi Bauer
23:30-03:00 Egilsstaðir

16. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

CHRISTMAS FAMILY SHOW - EGILSSTAÐIR

Christmas family show in Icelandic
15:00

Bach in Egilsstaðir church

Concert with songs after Johann Sebastian Bach.
17:00-18:00 Egilsstaðir

CHRISTMAS FAMILY SHOW - EGILSSTAÐIR

Christmas family show in Icelandic
17:00 Egilsstaðir

Christmas Concert - Djúpivogur

Christmas Concert with Eiríkur Hauksson Regína Ósk Rakel Páls Unnur Birna
20:00-22:00 Djúpivogur

17. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

18. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

Christmas Concert - Fáskrúðsfjörður

Christmas Concert with Eiríkur Hauksson Regína Ósk Rakel Páls Unnur Birna
20:00-22:00 Fáskrúðsfjörður

19. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

CHRISTMAS FAMILY SHOW - EGILSSTAÐIR

Christmas family show in Icelandic
18:00 Egilsstaðir

Christmas Concert - Neskaupstaður

Christmas Concert with Eiríkur Hauksson Regína Ósk Rakel Páls Unnur Birna
20:00-22:00 Neskaupsstaður

20. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

Christmas Concert - Vopnafjörður

Christmas Concert with Eiríkur Hauksson Regína Ósk Rakel Páls Unnur Birna
20:00-22:00

21. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

Christmas Concert - Egilsstaðir

Christmas Concert with Eiríkur Hauksson Regína Ósk Rakel Páls Unnur Birna
20:00-22:00 Egilsstaðir

22. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

Partners tournament - Egilsstadir

Partners tournament and Christmas atmosphere in Askur Taproom
21:00-03:00 Egilsstaðir

23. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

24. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

25. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

26. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

27. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

28. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

29. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

Dance with Páll Óskar in Egilsstaðir

Dance with Páll Óskar in Egilsstaðir Tickets on https://midi.frettabladid.is/tonleikar/1/10720/Pall_Oskar_i_Valaskjalf
23:00-03:00 Egilsstaðir

30. December 2018

Sunday hike every Sunday

Every Sunday at 10 am the Touring Club of Fljotsdalsherad offers a 3-5 hour long walk in the surroundings of Egilsstadir. The meeting point is Tjarnarás 8 in Egilsstadir, the Touring Club´s office.
Egilsstaðir

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

31. December 2018

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

New Year's Eve fire - Egilsstaðir

New Year's Eve fire and fireworks in Egilsstaðanesi
16:30-18:00 Egilsstaðir

NEW YEAR'S EVE FIRE - DJUPIVOGUR

New Year's Eve fire and fireworks in Djúpivogur
17:00 Djúpivogur

1. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

2. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

3. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

4. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

5. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

Hike up to Grákollur - Reyðarfjörður

Hike up to Grákollur Height: 615 m Elevation: 580 m Hiking distance: 5-6 km Hiking time: 4-5 hours. (hiking up 2-2,5 hours) Start of the hike near the farm Kolmúli Price: 2.500,-
09:00-15:00 Reyðarfjörður

6. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

Outdoor festival to celebrate the end of Christmas - Egilsstaðir

Outdoor festival to celebrate the end of Christmas, fireworks, and fire.
16:00 Egilsstaðir

7. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

8. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

9. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

10. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

11. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

12. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

13. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

14. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

15. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

16. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

17. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

18. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

19. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

20. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

21. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

22. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

23. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

24. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

25. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

26. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

27. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

28. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

29. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

30. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

31. January 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

1. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

2. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

Hike up to Hrútafell - Fáskrúðsfjörður

Hike up to Mt Hrútafell Height: 1.069 m Elevation: 970 m Hiking distance: 17 km Hiking time: 5-6 hours. (hiking up 3-3,5 hours) Start of the hike near Fáskrúðsfjörður tunnel Price: 2.500,-
08:00-16:00 Fáskrúðsfjörður

3. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

4. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

5. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

6. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

7. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

8. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

9. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

10. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

11. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

12. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

13. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

14. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

15. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

List í ljósi - Seyðisfjörður

Each year in February List í ljósi festival returns to Seyðisfjörður, Iceland to light up the town in celebration of the arrival of the sun after four months of shadow. This is a free outdoor art event that is community driven and family friendly. Transforming Seyðisfjörður town into an illuminated buzzing hub of activity. The East Iceland town will light up with curated artworks by international and local artists, ranging from installations, projections and performances to large-scale immersive experiences. The festival hosts a week-long programme of activities including Flat Earth Film Festival, exhibitions, school workshops, parties and performances all for free throughout Seyðisfjörður.
Seyðisfjörður

16. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

List í ljósi - Seyðisfjörður

Each year in February List í ljósi festival returns to Seyðisfjörður, Iceland to light up the town in celebration of the arrival of the sun after four months of shadow. This is a free outdoor art event that is community driven and family friendly. Transforming Seyðisfjörður town into an illuminated buzzing hub of activity. The East Iceland town will light up with curated artworks by international and local artists, ranging from installations, projections and performances to large-scale immersive experiences. The festival hosts a week-long programme of activities including Flat Earth Film Festival, exhibitions, school workshops, parties and performances all for free throughout Seyðisfjörður.
Seyðisfjörður

17. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

18. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

19. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

20. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

21. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

22. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

23. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

24. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

25. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

26. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

27. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

28. February 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

1. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

2. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

Sandhólatindur (Mountain skiing and hiking tour) - Seyðisfjörður

Mt Sandhólatindur is the highest mountain near Seyðisfjörður. Height: 1.154 m Elevation: 1.120 m Hiking distance: 9-10 km Hiking time: 6-8 klst. (hiking up 3-4 klst) Start of the hike: From Háubakkar (30 m) Price: 2.500,-
08:00-16:00 Seyðisfjörður

3. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Hvít sól - Seyðisfjörður

The artist group IYFAC (Inspirational Young Female Artist Club) have for the past months researched time as a concept and experience, as well as the connection that humans have with the sun. We who live in the northern hemisphere are used to the changing daylight in summer and winter. Here, the sun may not be a reliable source for telling the time, but it still takes us gently through the seasons of extreme light and darkness. If we would make our own solar clock, what would it look like and what would it measure? Our existence is interwoven time. Up to a certain degree, the sense of time is built into the consciousness of human beings. From a very young age we are trained to understand chronology and are required to learn to tell time, but our everyday life is a mixture of subjective and objective sensing of time. The sun has a key role in this interplay. The position of the sun tells us how time passes. It is quite common to find natural reference points in towns and villages, such as certain mountain tops or stone formations, that are used as solar clocks. The exhibition White sun opens in wintertime while the sun rises too low to be able to reach the town in its valley, making it difficult to tell the time of the day by referring to the sun. The IYFAC group therefore brought symbolically preserved “suns” from high summer with them, in order to build another solar clock for the winter. The whole gallery space is transformed into a big installation in which the oversized sunflags play the key role. The flags hang side by side down from the ceiling and form a kind of solar path for the viewers. A part of the installation is an audio piece, which interprets the solar cycle, composed by Daníel Helgason. While moving around the space the viewer is offered an experience of time that differs from the everyday. The real sun, the earth’s life giver, has stopped being the reference point and has been replaced by manmade suns, providing an alternative sensual way of measuring time in a place where the seasonal light conditions would otherwise make this impossible. White Sun is ongoing until March 3, 2019. Kv. Tinna
Seyðisfjörður

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

4. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

5. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

6. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

7. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

8. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

9. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

10. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

11. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

12. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

Tuesday hikes - Egilsstaðir

Every Tuesday this winter there will be hikes from Egilsstaðir. Meeting point is at the car parking at the campsite.
Egilsstaðir

13. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

14. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

15. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

16. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

17. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

18. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

19. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

20. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

21. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

22. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

23. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

24. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

25. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

26. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

27. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

28. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

29. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

30. March 2019

Winter running - Egilsstaðir

Last Saturday each month will be outdoor running in Egilsstaðir. It is a 10 km run and starts in the gymnasium in Egilsstaðir
Egilsstaðir

6. April 2019

Hike up to Snjótindur - Álftafjörður

Hike up to Mt Snjótindur in Álftafjörður Price: 2.500 kr
08:00-18:00 Álftafjörður

18. April 2019

Festival in the Ski area in Oddskard

Festival over the Eastern in the ski area in Oddskarð. All kinds of events over these days.
Oddskarð

19. April 2019

Festival in the Ski area in Oddskard

Festival over the Eastern in the ski area in Oddskarð. All kinds of events over these days.
Oddskarð

20. April 2019

Festival in the Ski area in Oddskard

Festival over the Eastern in the ski area in Oddskarð. All kinds of events over these days.
Oddskarð

21. April 2019

Festival in the Ski area in Oddskard

Festival over the Eastern in the ski area in Oddskarð. All kinds of events over these days.
Oddskarð

22. April 2019

Festival in the Ski area in Oddskard

Festival over the Eastern in the ski area in Oddskarð. All kinds of events over these days.
Oddskarð

25. April 2019

Hammond Festival - Djúpivogur

A four-day music festival where the main purpose is to honor and introduce the Hammond pipe. Local artists and well-known artists play their music at the festival. The festival is always held on the first day of summer.
www.hammond.djupivogur.is/

26. April 2019

Hammond Festival - Djúpivogur

A four-day music festival where the main purpose is to honor and introduce the Hammond pipe. Local artists and well-known artists play their music at the festival. The festival is always held on the first day of summer.
www.hammond.djupivogur.is/

27. April 2019

Hammond Festival - Djúpivogur

A four-day music festival where the main purpose is to honor and introduce the Hammond pipe. Local artists and well-known artists play their music at the festival. The festival is always held on the first day of summer.
www.hammond.djupivogur.is/

28. April 2019

Hammond Festival - Djúpivogur

A four-day music festival where the main purpose is to honor and introduce the Hammond pipe. Local artists and well-known artists play their music at the festival. The festival is always held on the first day of summer.
www.hammond.djupivogur.is/

22. June 2019

FJARÐABYGGÐ HIKING WEEK

FJARÐABYGGÐ HIKING WEEK A WEEK-LONG HIKING FESTIVAL The last week in June which includes two Saturdays is the time to come for Fjarðabyggð Hiking Week. This is one of Iceland's biggest outdoor recreation events, a whole eight days of entertainment and organized activities to suit the entire family. Get on your feet and try it out, enjoying the nature of the East Fjords in all its splendor and variety! The week's programme spans from family walks to historical walks and even to challenges for hiking mountaineers, as well as categories in between. The youngest generation can participate in an outdoor activities course. Evening entertainment is provided every day, including singing, music, and parties. During the eight days of Fjarðabyggð Hiking Week, numerous walks and hikes are offered, varying in length and graded for their difficulty. Scheduled entertainment, such as communal singing, provides a pleasant conclusion to every day. You can either pay for individual events or you can buy a pass that will allow admission to all events. The five mountains are a fun challenge for all participants. Regularly, five mountains are chosen to represent the mountains of Fjarðabyggð in the hiking week and those who climb these mountains during the week get the honorary title Fjarðabyggð Mountain Hiker. For children 15 years old or younger, hiking three of those mountains will suffice to obtain the desirable title. During the hiking week, organizers have offered a school of nature for the youngest participants so that parents can get the opportunity to partake in the walks that are not suitable for small feet.
Fjarðabyggð

23. June 2019

FJARÐABYGGÐ HIKING WEEK

FJARÐABYGGÐ HIKING WEEK A WEEK-LONG HIKING FESTIVAL The last week in June which includes two Saturdays is the time to come for Fjarðabyggð Hiking Week. This is one of Iceland's biggest outdoor recreation events, a whole eight days of entertainment and organized activities to suit the entire family. Get on your feet and try it out, enjoying the nature of the East Fjords in all its splendor and variety! The week's programme spans from family walks to historical walks and even to challenges for hiking mountaineers, as well as categories in between. The youngest generation can participate in an outdoor activities course. Evening entertainment is provided every day, including singing, music, and parties. During the eight days of Fjarðabyggð Hiking Week, numerous walks and hikes are offered, varying in length and graded for their difficulty. Scheduled entertainment, such as communal singing, provides a pleasant conclusion to every day. You can either pay for individual events or you can buy a pass that will allow admission to all events. The five mountains are a fun challenge for all participants. Regularly, five mountains are chosen to represent the mountains of Fjarðabyggð in the hiking week and those who climb these mountains during the week get the honorary title Fjarðabyggð Mountain Hiker. For children 15 years old or younger, hiking three of those mountains will suffice to obtain the desirable title. During the hiking week, organizers have offered a school of nature for the youngest participants so that parents can get the opportunity to partake in the walks that are not suitable for small feet.
Fjarðabyggð

24. June 2019

FJARÐABYGGÐ HIKING WEEK

FJARÐABYGGÐ HIKING WEEK A WEEK-LONG HIKING FESTIVAL The last week in June which includes two Saturdays is the time to come for Fjarðabyggð Hiking Week. This is one of Iceland's biggest outdoor recreation events, a whole eight days of entertainment and organized activities to suit the entire family. Get on your feet and try it out, enjoying the nature of the East Fjords in all its splendor and variety! The week's programme spans from family walks to historical walks and even to challenges for hiking mountaineers, as well as categories in between. The youngest generation can participate in an outdoor activities course. Evening entertainment is provided every day, including singing, music, and parties. During the eight days of Fjarðabyggð Hiking Week, numerous walks and hikes are offered, varying in length and graded for their difficulty. Scheduled entertainment, such as communal singing, provides a pleasant conclusion to every day. You can either pay for individual events or you can buy a pass that will allow admission to all events. The five mountains are a fun challenge for all participants. Regularly, five mountains are chosen to represent the mountains of Fjarðabyggð in the hiking week and those who climb these mountains during the week get the honorary title Fjarðabyggð Mountain Hiker. For children 15 years old or younger, hiking three of those mountains will suffice to obtain the desirable title. During the hiking week, organizers have offered a school of nature for the youngest participants so that parents can get the opportunity to partake in the walks that are not suitable for small feet.
Fjarðabyggð

25. June 2019

FJARÐABYGGÐ HIKING WEEK

FJARÐABYGGÐ HIKING WEEK A WEEK-LONG HIKING FESTIVAL The last week in June which includes two Saturdays is the time to come for Fjarðabyggð Hiking Week. This is one of Iceland's biggest outdoor recreation events, a whole eight days of entertainment and organized activities to suit the entire family. Get on your feet and try it out, enjoying the nature of the East Fjords in all its splendor and variety! The week's programme spans from family walks to historical walks and even to challenges for hiking mountaineers, as well as categories in between. The youngest generation can participate in an outdoor activities course. Evening entertainment is provided every day, including singing, music, and parties. During the eight days of Fjarðabyggð Hiking Week, numerous walks and hikes are offered, varying in length and graded for their difficulty. Scheduled entertainment, such as communal singing, provides a pleasant conclusion to every day. You can either pay for individual events or you can buy a pass that will allow admission to all events. The five mountains are a fun challenge for all participants. Regularly, five mountains are chosen to represent the mountains of Fjarðabyggð in the hiking week and those who climb these mountains during the week get the honorary title Fjarðabyggð Mountain Hiker. For children 15 years old or younger, hiking three of those mountains will suffice to obtain the desirable title. During the hiking week, organizers have offered a school of nature for the youngest participants so that parents can get the opportunity to partake in the walks that are not suitable for small feet.
Fjarðabyggð

26. June 2019

FJARÐABYGGÐ HIKING WEEK

FJARÐABYGGÐ HIKING WEEK A WEEK-LONG HIKING FESTIVAL The last week in June which includes two Saturdays is the time to come for Fjarðabyggð Hiking Week. This is one of Iceland's biggest outdoor recreation events, a whole eight days of entertainment and organized activities to suit the entire family. Get on your feet and try it out, enjoying the nature of the East Fjords in all its splendor and variety! The week's programme spans from family walks to historical walks and even to challenges for hiking mountaineers, as well as categories in between. The youngest generation can participate in an outdoor activities course. Evening entertainment is provided every day, including singing, music, and parties. During the eight days of Fjarðabyggð Hiking Week, numerous walks and hikes are offered, varying in length and graded for their difficulty. Scheduled entertainment, such as communal singing, provides a pleasant conclusion to every day. You can either pay for individual events or you can buy a pass that will allow admission to all events. The five mountains are a fun challenge for all participants. Regularly, five mountains are chosen to represent the mountains of Fjarðabyggð in the hiking week and those who climb these mountains during the week get the honorary title Fjarðabyggð Mountain Hiker. For children 15 years old or younger, hiking three of those mountains will suffice to obtain the desirable title. During the hiking week, organizers have offered a school of nature for the youngest participants so that parents can get the opportunity to partake in the walks that are not suitable for small feet.
Fjarðabyggð

27. June 2019

FJARÐABYGGÐ HIKING WEEK

FJARÐABYGGÐ HIKING WEEK A WEEK-LONG HIKING FESTIVAL The last week in June which includes two Saturdays is the time to come for Fjarðabyggð Hiking Week. This is one of Iceland's biggest outdoor recreation events, a whole eight days of entertainment and organized activities to suit the entire family. Get on your feet and try it out, enjoying the nature of the East Fjords in all its splendor and variety! The week's programme spans from family walks to historical walks and even to challenges for hiking mountaineers, as well as categories in between. The youngest generation can participate in an outdoor activities course. Evening entertainment is provided every day, including singing, music, and parties. During the eight days of Fjarðabyggð Hiking Week, numerous walks and hikes are offered, varying in length and graded for their difficulty. Scheduled entertainment, such as communal singing, provides a pleasant conclusion to every day. You can either pay for individual events or you can buy a pass that will allow admission to all events. The five mountains are a fun challenge for all participants. Regularly, five mountains are chosen to represent the mountains of Fjarðabyggð in the hiking week and those who climb these mountains during the week get the honorary title Fjarðabyggð Mountain Hiker. For children 15 years old or younger, hiking three of those mountains will suffice to obtain the desirable title. During the hiking week, organizers have offered a school of nature for the youngest participants so that parents can get the opportunity to partake in the walks that are not suitable for small feet.
Fjarðabyggð

28. June 2019

FJARÐABYGGÐ HIKING WEEK

FJARÐABYGGÐ HIKING WEEK A WEEK-LONG HIKING FESTIVAL The last week in June which includes two Saturdays is the time to come for Fjarðabyggð Hiking Week. This is one of Iceland's biggest outdoor recreation events, a whole eight days of entertainment and organized activities to suit the entire family. Get on your feet and try it out, enjoying the nature of the East Fjords in all its splendor and variety! The week's programme spans from family walks to historical walks and even to challenges for hiking mountaineers, as well as categories in between. The youngest generation can participate in an outdoor activities course. Evening entertainment is provided every day, including singing, music, and parties. During the eight days of Fjarðabyggð Hiking Week, numerous walks and hikes are offered, varying in length and graded for their difficulty. Scheduled entertainment, such as communal singing, provides a pleasant conclusion to every day. You can either pay for individual events or you can buy a pass that will allow admission to all events. The five mountains are a fun challenge for all participants. Regularly, five mountains are chosen to represent the mountains of Fjarðabyggð in the hiking week and those who climb these mountains during the week get the honorary title Fjarðabyggð Mountain Hiker. For children 15 years old or younger, hiking three of those mountains will suffice to obtain the desirable title. During the hiking week, organizers have offered a school of nature for the youngest participants so that parents can get the opportunity to partake in the walks that are not suitable for small feet.
Fjarðabyggð

10. July 2019

Eistnaflug rock festival- Neskaupstaður

Music festival in Neskaupstaður that consists of the friendliest metalheads, rockers and overall party animals that you will ever meet. From indie rock to hardcore rock to black metal, that is what Eistnaflug has to offer and of course a great atmosphere and vibe.
Neskaupstaður

11. July 2019

Eistnaflug rock festival- Neskaupstaður

Music festival in Neskaupstaður that consists of the friendliest metalheads, rockers and overall party animals that you will ever meet. From indie rock to hardcore rock to black metal, that is what Eistnaflug has to offer and of course a great atmosphere and vibe.
Neskaupstaður

12. July 2019

Eistnaflug rock festival- Neskaupstaður

Music festival in Neskaupstaður that consists of the friendliest metalheads, rockers and overall party animals that you will ever meet. From indie rock to hardcore rock to black metal, that is what Eistnaflug has to offer and of course a great atmosphere and vibe.
Neskaupstaður

13. July 2019

Eistnaflug rock festival- Neskaupstaður

Music festival in Neskaupstaður that consists of the friendliest metalheads, rockers and overall party animals that you will ever meet. From indie rock to hardcore rock to black metal, that is what Eistnaflug has to offer and of course a great atmosphere and vibe.
Neskaupstaður

20. July 2019

Dyrfjallahlaup race - Borgarfjörður Eystri

2018 will be the second time this race around the mountains of Dyrfjöll is held. Dyrfjöll are some of the more majestic mountains in the East. Their name means "Door mountains" and the name comes from the pass that goes right between the mountain ridge, like a door ("Door Mountains Race"). It's certainly worth the visit every day, but for a mountain runner, the Dyrfjallahlaup race is the perfect event to explore the area. The view from the mountain passes on this route does not let anyone down. Elevation is more than 1000 meters so one gets a good view over the area. The route also lies through Stórurð, which consists of gigantic boulders made of tuff, meadows and fresh water ponds. Distance 22.97km Elevation 1087m Highest point 683 m above sea level
Borgarfjarðar Eystri

24. July 2019

Bræðslan music festival - Borgarfjörður Eystri

In Borgarfjörður Eystri, a small fishing hamlet of only 130 people, Bræðslan music festival is held every year. They only sell 800 tickets. It’s held in an old fishing factory. In the past, big names like Of Monsters And Men, Mammút, Belle & Sebastian, Emiliana Torrini, and Damien Rice have played this exclusive festival. Prepare for an experience you’ll be talking about for the rest of your life.
Borgarfjörður Eystri

25. July 2019

Bræðslan music festival - Borgarfjörður Eystri

In Borgarfjörður Eystri, a small fishing hamlet of only 130 people, Bræðslan music festival is held every year. They only sell 800 tickets. It’s held in an old fishing factory. In the past, big names like Of Monsters And Men, Mammút, Belle & Sebastian, Emiliana Torrini, and Damien Rice have played this exclusive festival. Prepare for an experience you’ll be talking about for the rest of your life.
Borgarfjörður Eystri

French Days in Fáskrúðsfjörður

This pleasant three-day festival, a special connection for Fáskrúðsfjörður of France and French seamen being earlier centuries mentioned in various ways. Locals and visitors have a good time, as well as representatives from the French town of Gravelines friends join in the celebrations.
Fáskrúðsfjörður

26. July 2019

Bræðslan music festival - Borgarfjörður Eystri

In Borgarfjörður Eystri, a small fishing hamlet of only 130 people, Bræðslan music festival is held every year. They only sell 800 tickets. It’s held in an old fishing factory. In the past, big names like Of Monsters And Men, Mammút, Belle & Sebastian, Emiliana Torrini, and Damien Rice have played this exclusive festival. Prepare for an experience you’ll be talking about for the rest of your life.
Borgarfjörður Eystri

French Days in Fáskrúðsfjörður

This pleasant three-day festival, a special connection for Fáskrúðsfjörður of France and French seamen being earlier centuries mentioned in various ways. Locals and visitors have a good time, as well as representatives from the French town of Gravelines friends join in the celebrations.
Fáskrúðsfjörður

27. July 2019

Bræðslan music festival - Borgarfjörður Eystri

In Borgarfjörður Eystri, a small fishing hamlet of only 130 people, Bræðslan music festival is held every year. They only sell 800 tickets. It’s held in an old fishing factory. In the past, big names like Of Monsters And Men, Mammút, Belle & Sebastian, Emiliana Torrini, and Damien Rice have played this exclusive festival. Prepare for an experience you’ll be talking about for the rest of your life.
Borgarfjörður Eystri

French Days in Fáskrúðsfjörður

This pleasant three-day festival, a special connection for Fáskrúðsfjörður of France and French seamen being earlier centuries mentioned in various ways. Locals and visitors have a good time, as well as representatives from the French town of Gravelines friends join in the celebrations.
Fáskrúðsfjörður

28. July 2019

Bræðslan music festival - Borgarfjörður Eystri

In Borgarfjörður Eystri, a small fishing hamlet of only 130 people, Bræðslan music festival is held every year. They only sell 800 tickets. It’s held in an old fishing factory. In the past, big names like Of Monsters And Men, Mammút, Belle & Sebastian, Emiliana Torrini, and Damien Rice have played this exclusive festival. Prepare for an experience you’ll be talking about for the rest of your life.
Borgarfjörður Eystri

French Days in Fáskrúðsfjörður

This pleasant three-day festival, a special connection for Fáskrúðsfjörður of France and French seamen being earlier centuries mentioned in various ways. Locals and visitors have a good time, as well as representatives from the French town of Gravelines friends join in the celebrations.
Fáskrúðsfjörður

3. August 2019

Bardsnes off road run - Neskaupstaður

The Bardsnes off road run is an annual 27 km adventure race in East-Iceland, held in and around the town of Neskaupstadur the first Saturday in August. In Iceland, the first weekend of August is "Verslunarmannahelgi" or, loosely translated, "service worker's weekend" during which many outdoor festivities are held in Iceland. One of these "fiestas" is held in the town of Neskaupstadur where the race ends (check out the route on the map) and the townspeople greet every runner when he or she crosses the finishing line. The Bardsnes run is categorized as for everyone that is "relatively" fit, but it must be pointed out that parts of the route can be very difficult, especially for the unseasoned runner and for people not used to walking in rocky mountain landscape. The run starts at the Bardsnes farm on the cape of Bardsnes. From there the runners race through the fjords of Vidfjordur, Hellisfjordur and Nordfjordur, finishing in down town Neskaupstadur. If you are not up to the whole 27 km race you can participate in a shorter run which spans the latter half of the Bardsnes run. This circa 13 km run starts hence in Hellisfjordur and ends in Neskaupstadur. The ideal run for beginners.
Neskaupstaður

East Iceland

Towns & Villages

Each town in East Iceland has its own characteristics. In some of the coastal villages the influence of North European neighbours is obvious to everyone. 

The French made a strong impact in Fáskrúðsfjörður where the road signs are made out in French as well as in Icelandic. Norwegian influence is easily detected in the Eskifjörður and Seydisfjörður architecture. No such roots are to be seen in Egilsstadir which is latest addition to East Iceland agglomeration, founded in the late forties of the 20th century.  

Map Vopnafjörður Borgarfjörður Eystri Egilsstaðir Seyðisfjörður Mjóifjörður Neskaupstaður Breiðdalsvík Eskifjörður Reyðarfjörður Fáskrúðsfjörður Stöðvarfjörður Djúpivogur